Don’t forget Higher’s Webinars!

Each year Higher develops professional webinars for the field of refugee employment. Each webinar reflects a theme trending in refugee employment. Check out the “Resources” section of our website to access the recordings. Below are links to webinars from Fiscal Year 2018, which cover how to design and measure a career advancement program, utilizing labor market information to maximize your job development, and case management efforts.

  1. Higher Presents: How to Design and Measure a Successful Career Advancement Programwas presented on June 26, 2018. This webinar features guest speakers from USCRI of North Carolina and ORR’s technical assistance provider for monitoring and evaluation, (IRC’s META).

 

  1. Higher Presents: A Guide to Labor Market Information for Refugee Employmentpresented March 27, 2018. Higher announces the publication of the guide to Labor Market Information (LMI) and how it can be used to maximize employment outcomes. Listen to the recorded webinar on LMI and the official release of the LMI guidebook. This includes a discussion with a refugee employment manager who reviewed and implemented the Higher LMI guide in the field and a Bureau of Labor Statistics LMI state representative from the State of Maryland.

 

Past webinars can be found, free to all, on Higher’s Online Learning Institute. Once you register with a username and password, you will have access to webinars, publications, and 16 online learning modules to further your professional development.

Would you or your office like to receive additional training from Higher? Please write to us at information@higheradvantage.org.

Please follow and like us:

Higher’s Guide to Labor Market Information: Occupational Profiles Tool

Labor Market Information (LMI) enables refugee employment teams to utilize data to enhance their career counseling, job development, and job readiness classes.  In this post, Higher will highlight one aspect of Higher’s A Guide to Labor Market Information for Refugee Employment Programs, the Occupational Profile tool, which is available on CareerOneStop, an LMI database.

LMI is data provided by the US Department of Labor that incorporates statistics from employers across the nation. Within LMI, the Occupational Profile is a tool that gathers industry information on various fields and positions and provides data to the public.

How to Use the Occupational Profile – Example

Imagine you are in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, meeting with a client who has returned for long term career planning. The client has experience in crane operation from her country and is interested in returning to that field. You are unfamiliar with that position or industry and need to understand the client’s experience and how to assist the client in crafting an industry specific resume and long term career plan. To start, you open the Occupational Profile and search for the position. After clicking search, the occupational profile opens up with a description of job duties, responsibilities, and a career video. (For more details on the job duties and responsibilities, you may also use O*NET, the second LMI database, which holds similar information as CareerOneStop but in a different format.)

The Occupational Profile also provides details on national and state-specific employment projections. For example, Crane and Tower Operators projections show that job growth in this filed is slower in Alabama, than the United States as a whole. Based on the information provided you could select “Compare Projected Employment button to what other states will have more potential positions in the future. Select View Chart or View Map to compare. The information from the profile also indicates if the field is shrinking. Since the example highlights less potential growth, there could be other positions in the same industry that have more openings in the future. The Occupational Profile includes a list of related occupations for any selected position.

Another component of the Occupational Profile is Education and Experience: to get started as well as Typical Education. The Education and Experience box highlights what credentials people starting in this career often possess and some programs that can prepare a potential worker. Typical Education allows viewers to learn about the average educational level for workers in the field. For the example of Crane and Tower Operators, the diagram shows that 50% have a high school diploma or equivalent, and 24% have some college, but no degree. This information suggests that pursuing higher education for this field is unnecessary.

The Occupational Profile also provides wage information, required certifications and training, and skills and abilities of people in that field.

Accessing the Occupational Profile allows any employment professional to gather data to respect their client’s experience to benefit their future career.

Considerations

It is important to remember that as LMI data is gathered nationally every two years. Utilizing local sources like American Job Centers that collect real-time, local employer, or training information, might help to provide the most concrete information to refugee job seekers.

Of course, LMI databases or toolkits are not meant to replace local relationships and partnerships. To run reports, ask questions, or learn more about your state or local area, contact your state’s LMI expert.

The Occupational Profile is just one of many tools found on CareerOneStop; Higher also recommends discovering local businesses on the Business Finder, using Comparing Local Wages, and Local Training Finder.  For more information on Labor Market Information, check out Higher’s A Guide to Labor Market Information for Refugee Employment Programs.

How do you use labor market information to help inform client’s career pathways? Share with us at information@higheradvantage.org.

Please follow and like us:

Labor Market Information Strategies: Wage and Benefit Negotiation

Labor Market Information (LMI) is an excellent source of national and state job market data that resettlement programs utilize to make informed decisions on employers, particular industries, and wages. LMI might seem complicated and overwhelming to jump into; however, the benefits to you and your clients are well worth the effort.  Here is an example from Atlanta.

Lutheran Services of Georgia

Lutheran Services of Georgia Matching Grant program has been using LMI to empower their job developers with knowledge and tools for self-sufficiency success. Job Developer Meron Daniel shows us how. Meron noticed that while most families in LMI’s Matching Grant Program are self-sufficient and are financially comfortable enough to pay their bills, many are  unable to save enough money to make major purchases such as a house or car, and may not have a financial cushion in case of an emergency. Thus, Meron explored ways to increase client wages.

Meron started by gathering information on pay and benefits from employers that were already hiring refugees. Then, she used LMI to compare that data to wages for the same industries in the Atlanta area.  Armed with this information, Meron was able to demonstrate to a potential hotel employer offering a starting wage of just $8.50 an hour, that other hotels were paying $9.50 to $10 per hour for the same position. As a result, the hotel came onboard at $11 an hour – clients are happy and the hotel is competitive with its peers and has improved employee retention. A win-win outcome for everyone.

Suggestions

When negotiating on behalf of clients, Meron advises having your pitch and LMI data ready, being transparent with the employer, highlighting all the costs a particular family may have, emphasizing the services your agency provides, and stressing how vital it is for the family to be self-sufficient. In Meron’s experience, Human Resource recruiters have been open to negotiations and may even use the LMI data to make the case for higher wages to their corporate bosses. Meron recommends that if an employer cannot immediately increase pay based on the LMI information, perhaps they will be willing to offer other employee benefits such as free transportation or expanded health care benefits.

Finding LMI for your area

Higher’s Guide to Labor Market Information tells you how to access specific LMI and offers specific examples on how to use the data in  negotiations. LMI databases, like CareerOneStop or O’NET, have tools available to find wage information for industries in particular areas. Additionally, each state has an LMI expert that is available to help create reports or answer questions.

How do you use labor market information when meeting with employers? Share with us at information@higheradvantage.org.

Please follow and like us:

Higher Presents: A Guide to Labor Market Information for Refugee Employment

Higher is excited to announce the publication of a guide to understanding and utilizing Labor Market Information to maximize refugee employment outcomes.  Whether you are a seasoned refugee employment professional or new to the field, labor market information (LMI) is a valuable tool for counseling refugees on employment options and matching clients with quality job placements. For job development, LMI can arm you with the information to elevate job placements that are low-skill entry-level jobs to a higher quality first job placement. For job readiness training, LMI helps you tailor curricula to meet the skills employers require for specific jobs.

Join Higher Tuesday, March 27 at 3 PM for a webinar on LMI and the official release of the LMI guidebook. The webinar will include a review of the guide and a discussion with a refugee employment manager on strategies for utilizing LMI in the field.

REGISTER HERE

Please follow and like us:

High-Paying Jobs Refugees can Access without a Bachelor’s Degree

A common misconception in our field is that higher paying jobs are not available without a Bachelor’s Degree (BA). According to the Good Jobs Project, however, there are 30 million “good jobs” across the United States that pay well and do not require BAs. Knowing where to find these jobs can assist employment staff and refugees in identifying career pathways that do not require expensive four-year degrees.

A “good job” is defined as one “with earnings of at least $35,000 annually for those under age 45 and earnings of at least $45,000 annually for workers age 45 and older.” The 30 million good jobs that don’t require a BA identified by The Good Jobs Project have median annual earnings of $55,000. Even though a BA isn’t needed for these jobs, researchers found the best-paying positions still require some education. Training, such as associate degree programs or trade skill certifications, may be necessary to secure a good job. When discussing career planning with refugees, it is essential for employment staff to explain the difference between BA education requirements and associate or technical education requirements.

The Good Jobs Project, completed by The Georgetown Center and JPMorgan Chase, includes a website and report analyzing the job market across the United States. The narrative report shows what careers are available state-by-state without the need of a BA through analysis of US Census Bureau and Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

 

State Data Available

 

The report offers state-specific data including pay information, industry changes over time (from 1991 – 2015), jobs by educational attainment, and the top five industries and occupations where non-BA jobs are found. For example, Illinois has a median earning of $58,000 for non-BA workers in 2015. Fifty-six percent of Illinois workers were employed in blue-collar industries versus 44 percent in skilled-services industries. The top five industries in IL where good jobs are available without requiring a BA include:

  1. Manufacturing
  2. Transportation and utilities
  3. Construction
  4. Information, financial activities, and real estate
  5. Health services

In addition to the narrative report, the user-friendly website offers data on good jobs that can be filtered by industry, education, occupations, geography, and gender. To learn more about the methodology and resources, click on the main menu drop down feature on the top right hand of their website.

As refugee employment professionals, understanding labor market information like that included in The Good Jobs Project can help you locate career pathways or “good jobs” over lower-paid, survival jobs. For example, a job developer in Illinois might decide, after reviewing the data from the Good Jobs Project that their team has not tapped into the Transportation and utilities field and could be missing out on opportunities for their clients.

For more information on educational requirements for specific sectors and occupations, check out to the BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook. Another tool for researching particular industry sectors is CareerOneStop, where you can find a directory of employers, career guidelines, training programs, and local resources.

 

What are ways that your program provides career advancement opportunities for refugees? Send us your best practices at information@higheradvantage.org!

 

Please follow and like us:

Thinking Strategically about Survival Jobs

Source: http://allstarluxury.com

Source: http://allstarluxury.com

It’s never too early to think about the long-term success of our clients. Although our job development efforts are often focused on initial survival jobs for our clients, it’s important to realize that these jobs don’t have to be dead-end jobs. In fact, some of the industries that we commonly place clients in are industries that are expected to experience serious labor shortages.

A recent Fast Company article titled “5 Jobs that Will Be the Hardest to Fill in 2025” summarized a 2016 report by The Conference Board which predicts that the following industries will have the hardest time finding workers in the coming decade:

Skilled Trades– Large numbers of workers are retiring, but fewer young people are choosing these professions. Electricians, machinists, plant and system operators, rail transportation workers and other skilled trades workers will be in high demand.

Health Care– Healthcare workers of all types will be in greater demand in the coming years. Occupational and physical therapy aides, health diagnosing and treating professionals and home health aides are a few of the professions that expect to experience worker shortages.

Manufacturing– U.S. manufacturing will face a shortage of 2 million workers by 2020 in areas ranging from engineering to production workers.

Sales– Everyone knows that sales is a tough gig. In a nation of consumers, companies rely on brilliant sales people, but they struggle to find them. This will continue to be an issue for companies, large and small, in the coming years.

Math-related fields– While STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields in general are not predicted to be at risk for shortages, jobs that require specialized mathematical skills are in danger of not finding enough talent. Some of these jobs include actuaries, statisticians, and mathematically-minded professionals to work in the big-data sector.

Perhaps with the exception of sales (which in most cases is not a good fit for newly arrived refugees), these fields have great potential as career pathways for refugee job seekers, whether low-skilled or high-skilled.

Healthcare and manufacturing are common industries that we place newly arrived refugees in, and not only offer entry-level jobs, but in many cases offer a career path as well.

Skilled trades are a bit harder to access, but there are some refugees who come with these skills, and opportunities such as on-the-job training and apprenticeships can be a helpful entry point for clients who have the skills and the English ability.

And finally, while it may be a smaller percentage of our clients, we’ve all met refugees who bring STEM skills, including mathematical skills, who are so impressive that it’s intimidating (let’s be honest!).

So next time you’re doing employer outreach why not focus on one of these industries? You may find a survival job that leads to a long-term career path or you may find an employer who desperately needs the skills that one of your clients just happens to have!

For more on using labor market information for job development, check out our post “Using Data to Drive Job Development.”

Please follow and like us:

Using Data to Drive Job Development

With such limited time and capacity, you’ve got to make the most out of the time you have for Job Development.

Back in February, we highlighted some online industry research tools available on www.careeronestop.org that can help Job Developers be strategic about what industries they pursue by looking at local labor market information such as fastest growing occupations, most total job openings and occupations with the largest employment.

We’ve recently come across a similar (though less extensive) resource that also presents labor market information, but in a format that is much more user-friendly and more visually appealing.

Where-are-the-jobs.com provides a “graphic representation of occupation employment statistics.” The website was developed by SymSoft Solutions using open data provided by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau, and provides insights on employment trends and salary information for various occupations.

This helpful website allows you to view big-picture information such as top industries across the nation, or filter search results by occupation group, specific occupation, state or metro areas. For example, here is what you get when you filter results for “Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations” in the San Diego – Carlsbad, CA area:

Where are the Jobs Visual

We hope that this tool as well as the resources available at careeronestop.org will increase your ability to use your time wisely and strategically identify the best opportunities for your clients.

If you have any stories about how you’ve used data-driven strategies to drive your job development efforts we’d love to hear them. Share your story by emailing us at information@higheradvantage.org or by using the comments section below.

 

 

Please follow and like us: