High Retention Rates make Refugee Employees a Marketable Asset

Employee turnover is expensive.  Refugees tend to stay in the same job longer than others in the US workforce. Volag USCRI cites 96% retention rates (from 2012 national Matching Grant data) in a great package of materials they have provided to all of the resettlement agencies in their network.  After long journeys to safety or long stays in refugee camps or third countries where they weren’t allowed to work, refugees often crave job stability.  All of the employment services we provide contribute to those retention rates.

Many studies estimate the cost of losing an employee from 20% to as much as double their annual salary.  As the economy continues to improve and unemployment rates drop, companies are paying even more attention to employee retention strategies.   You can read more in depth coverage about that – and about the cost of employee turnover in a recent LinkedIn post we added to Higher’s customized news magazine on Flip Book.

Tara Mulder, LIRS Director of Marketing and Communication, says that statistics are always a strong selling point in any marketing communication.  Here are three practical tips for using high retention rate statistics in your own job development and communication strategies:

  1. Compile data you already track in monthly reports to generate your own statistic.  You might be able to use 90 day job retention and the total number of employment clients served compiled over a calendar year.
  2. Use that percentage in your sales pitch when you’re reaching out to new employers.  (if you also track the employer name, you could look at specific industries, which might give you a better statistic to use when targeting employers in that field.)
  3. Turn the data into a pie chart to add visual interest when bragging about your success rate on your website or in social media.  Also use it in an Employment Brochure.

Second Group of Mentors and Refugees Starts to Work in Lancaster, PA

Lancaster Mentoring Collage resize

Higher is partnering with Lutheran Refugee Service in Lancaster, PA in an exciting pilot project that will  help a growing number of refugees pursue their career goals, find a job upgrade and expand their community networks.  These pictures are from last week’s second cohort kick-off and orientation that started an additional seven partnerships off to a great start.  Read more about this innovative partnership in a recent Lancaster Online article, which motivated all seven of the mentors in the second group to get involved.

Khem Subedi, a Bhutanese refugee who was featured in the article, is now joined by his wife Pramila (in the beautiful green sari in the collage).  Follow the progress of Khem, Pramila, their mentors and the rest of the group by subscribing to Higher’s blog.   We’ll also be sharing what we learn so that others can help refugees deepen their community connections and professional success through mentoring.

Great Job Opportunity in a Great City and Agency

Higher is considering how we can help advertise refugee employment job opportunities.  Career growth in this field might mean moving to another agency or city.  For agencies, being able to cast a wider net for talent and experience can be costly.  Helping agencies and the refugee employment sector attract and retain people with skills, passion and experience is central to our mission.  We’ll be exploring how best to do that.  Feel free to tell us what you think about this or give us suggestions about other things we can do related to career development for refugee employment professionals.

For now, here’s a link to an exciting position open now – Employment Program Manager at Caritas of Austin, TX.  The position manages 10 people and oversees employment services to approximately 1,000 (primarily refugee) clients a year in the largest non-profit social service agency in the County.

 

Research Study Measures Economic Benefits of Job Upgrades Into Professional Career Tracks

It’s often difficult to help refugees with job upgrades or professional recertification, but the added income for refugees and contribution to the US economy make a  significant difference.  Skilled immigrants increased their average annualized salary by 121% (from an average of $16.967 to $37,490) when they begin working in a better job in their field.  A research study released by Upwardly Global in April of this year, documents and quantifies the economic benefits of employment assistance to help skilled immigrants secure job upgrades related to the careers in which they offer skills and experience.    Look for more resources and examples of job upgrade strategies and successes in professional recertification in the coming months at http://higheradvantage.org.

 

 

Low English Proficiency (LEP) Demographics

LEP US Map

Statistical analysis from the Migration Policy Institute highlights the increasing number of LEP residents in the US, especially in metropolitan areas and in California, Texas and New York.  Higher numbers of LEP men work in construction and extraction and LEP women in service and personal care.  How is the picture similar or different for your refugee clients?   Share your success stories, resources or models on our website http://higheradvantage.org.

Compensation Comparison for Three Attainable Jobs

worker pay

Hourly wage, number of hours per week and access to benefits are all important considerations for our clients.  For the whole article highlighting the benefits to employers of paying a living wage, go to http://money.cnn.com/2013/08/06/news/economy/costco-fast-food-strikes/index.htm.

NYTimes Article Provides Valuable Examples and Resource Leads for Physician Clients

A recent New York Times article outlines the barriers refugee and other immigrant physicians face to continue their practice in the US.  Providing a copy of this article to your physician clients will reinforce what you’re telling them, give them useful examples of other physicians in the US and point to two great resources you can help them find:  The Welcome Back Initiative and Upwardly Global.

Immigrant Professional Recertification Research

A new research study from the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) outlines the barriers and identifies possible solutions to the issue of skilled refugee professional recertification.  It is very much in line with our experiences as service providers helping refugee clients understand and address barriers they may face, learn about recertification options and seek pathways to reentering their profession and gaining US work experience, networks and US licensure.

You can find a link to the entire report in our Research and Reports section or by visiting the MPI website.

Resources from DOL!

We just added some Department of Labor fact sheets to the Resources section of our site. Check them out to learn more about how American Job Centers and the Workforce Investment System can help support refugee workers in your community.

Higher Welcomes Lorel Donaghey as Research and Communications Specialist

LorelWe’re very excited to announce that we are gaining a talented new staff member, Lorel Donaghey. Starting July 29, she will be adding her deep expertise to our team as Higher’s Research and Communications Specialist.

Lorel Donaghey comes to us from six and a half years in Texas at the Caritas of Austin Employment Program. There, she worked as Senior Employment Specialist and Job Developer, piloting both of those positions as the Employment unit expanded from 4 to 11 staff members.  She also served on the Higher Peer Advisory Network, contributing to our blog and other publications, and in online and peer exchange workshops.  Previously, she worked to strengthen nonprofits internationally in training, assessment, organizational development, and field office management.  Lorel has an MBA from Thunderbird School of Global Management, speaks Russian and Spanish, and brings a strong belief in the importance of helping refugees and other immigrant families succeed in the United States.

Lorel will primarily focus on Higher’s website, virtual trainings, and other online communications that are critical to the technical assistance we provide to front-line refugee employment professionals.  Lorel’s experience on the front lines, as well as her innovative ideas on how to strengthen refugee employment services, are really going to benefit Higher and LIRS as a whole.

LIRS’ President and CEO, Linda Hartke, had a chance to ask Lorel a few questions about her new role. Here’s what she said:

What personal experiences led you to become so committed to standing with refugees?

My commitment to standing with refugees really began with my previous career in international development.  When I came back to live in the United States, I wanted work that continued to engage with different cultures and had a global element.  Soon, admiration for the resilience, spirit and diverse contributions refugees make here at home joined that need for a broader worldview in my every day life as a sustaining motivation to continue working with refugee resettlement programs.

What excites you most about working with Higher?

I’ve had a little crush on LIRS since participating in Higher strategic planning with Higher Director Rebecca Armstrong and LIRS Vice President for Programs and Protection Mike Mitchell, and after hearing the expertise of the employment professionals in the LIRS field network whom I’ve met at Higher events.  So, I’m really thrilled to contribute in a more direct way.

But, I’m actually most excited about finding yet another way in which my life intersects with that of my great Aunt Dee, who lived across the street from my family and was 101 when she died.  She married a Lutheran minister when she was in her late 30s after traveling to attend college with her sisters in a covered wagon, graduating from Columbia in the late 1800’s as one of the first women to attend and traveling to Cuba as a missionary in a steam ship from New York City.  I definitely have her spirit of adventure and use the trunk she traveled with as a coffee table.  I hope I have her longevity, too!

What do you most hope to achieve while in your new position?

I’ve long wanted to do more work with online content and social media, especially after blogging for Higher as I started the Job Development function at Caritas of Austin, so I’m excited for the chance to further hone those skills in my new position.  Through that part of my work, I really hope I can help add the knowledge and passion of the  LIRS and Refugee Employment networks to the ongoing national conversation around immigration reform and the valuable contribution made by immigrants (including refugees) throughout U.S. history.